How Does Lead-Based Paint Effect Your Health?

Lead is a naturally occurring element found in small amounts in the earth’s crust. While it has some beneficial uses, it can be toxic to humans and animals causing negative health effects.

Where Can Lead Be Found?

The most common concern for humans comes from lead-based paint. It was used extensively in the ’40s through the ’60s. It was a very durable and easy to apply paint. When it deteriorates it can easily be ingested. The persons that are at greatest danger are small children in their developmental stage. See Lead Health Risks. Lead can be found in all parts of our environment – the air, the soil, the water, and even inside our homes. Much of our exposure comes from human activities including burning fossil fuels, mining, and manufacturing. Lead and lead compounds have been used in a wide variety of products found in and around our homes, including paint, ceramics, pipes and plumbing materials, solders, gasoline, batteries, ammunition, and cosmetics.

Lead may enter the environment from these past and current uses. Lead can also be emitted into the environment from industrial sources and contaminated sites, such as former lead smelters. While natural levels of lead in soil range between 50 and 400 parts per million, mining, smelting, and refining activities have resulted in substantial increases in lead levels in the environment, especially near mining and smelting sites.

When lead is released into the air from industrial sources or vehicles, it may travel long distances before settling to the ground, where it usually sticks to soil particles. Lead may move from soil into groundwater depending on the type of lead compound and the characteristics of the soil.

Federal and state regulatory standards have helped to minimize or eliminate the amount of lead in air, drinking water, soil, consumer products, food, and occupational settings.

 

Children

Lead is particularly dangerous to children because their growing bodies absorb more lead than adults do and their brains and nervous systems are more sensitive to the damaging effects of lead. Babies and young children can also be more highly exposed to lead because they often put their hands and other objects that can have lead from dust or soil on them into their mouths. Children may also be exposed to lead by eating and drinking food or water containing lead or from dishes or glasses that contain lead, inhaling lead dust from lead-based paint or lead-contaminated soil, or from playing with toys with lead paint.

 

Adults, Including Pregnant Women

Adults may be exposed to lead by eating and drinking food or water containing lead or from dishes or glasses that contain lead. They may also breathe lead dust by spending time in areas where lead-based paint is deteriorating, and during renovation or repair work that disturbs painted surfaces in older homes and buildings. Working in a job or engaging in hobbies where lead is used, such as making stained glass, can increase exposure as can certain folk remedies containing lead. A pregnant woman’s exposure to lead from these sources is of particular concern because it can result in exposure to her developing baby.

 

Lower Your Chances of Exposure to Lead

Simple steps like keeping your home clean and well-maintained will go a long way in preventing lead exposure. You can lower the chances of exposure to lead in your home, both now and in the future, by taking these steps:

  • Inspect and maintain all painted surfaces to prevent paint deterioration
  • Address water damage quickly and completely
  • Keep your home clean and dust-free
  • Clean around painted areas where friction can generate dust, such as doors, windows, and drawers. Wipe these areas with a wet sponge or rag to remove paint chips or dust
  • Use only cold water to prepare food and drinks
  • Flush water outlets used for drinking or food preparation
  • Clean debris out of outlet screens or faucet aerators on a regular basis
  • Wash children’s hands, bottles, pacifiers, and toys often
  • Teach children to wipe and remove their shoes and wash hands after playing outdoors
  • Ensure that your family members eat well-balanced meals. Children with healthy diets absorb less lead. Lead and a Healthy Diet, What You Can Do to Protect Your Child (PDF)

Always use licensed contractors with a history of proven results and make sure they follow lead-safe work practices.